Luca Dell'Aquila

I'M an Italian expat. As an aspiring travel writer, after years and years of a frugal life in Paris, I've decided recently to write a guide of unglamorous, cheap but soulful bars and restaurants of the city of lights.

10 NFT Questions:
My Day Job:
     looking for a job
What I'm listening to:
     Neutral Milk Hotel
What I'm reading:
     Underworld by Don DeLillo
What I've just seen:
     a lady playing a saw
What I believe in:
     anything
What pisses me off:
     everything
What I really think of NFT:
     NFT is my bible when I travel
What sanctifies me:
     italian coffee

Luca's Photos

Luca's Reviews & Comments
Sushiya 4/30/2012
Bored of all the chinese-fake sushi bars of Paris? If you are a raw fish lover this sushiya ("sushi shop" in japanese) is a must. Making a reservation is strongly recommended, as this pocket-sized restaurant has only 10 seats. Don't be in a hurry, one man does everything. Mr.Tashichi isn't perhaps the most welcoming of hosts at first sight — maybe for his nutty attitude, maybe for his incomprhensible mix of french, japanese and english, but, his cooking speaks for itself. Here, there's only super fresh fish cut in pieces as huge as your mouth that literally melt like butter. The choices are simple: the sushi plate (26 euros) with salmon, tuna, omelet, shrimp, salmon roe, mackerel, cone sushi and futomaki, or, the sashimi plate, similar but with octopus. In spite of the weird wall decor with japanese newspapers and baby photos, the reigning zen atmosphere will definitely inspire you to make an origami on site and add it to Mr. Taschichi's collection. Another reason to go? Unlimited green tea is offered upon arrival and you can also bring your personal bottle of Chardonnay. Indeed, an unwritten BYOB policy exists, very rare in Paris. Just as this place.
Le P'tit Bar 4/8/2012
This bar is a true time capsule. At first sight the front door can give the impression of an abandoned place. No fear, you're just starting a teleportation to the post-war era. Inside, a fat gray cat, a cage of parakeets, old bottles, half washed glasses, dust and mountains of books disordely accumulated everywhere. Madame Paulo runs this hole-in-the-wall since 1965. She is perhaps the oldest bartender ever, her age is legendary, some say over 90s. What keeps this grandmother here serving belgian beers and calvados? Her answer could be the recipe for a long mental vitality: "I thought to close the bar many times, espcially after my husband's death, but you know, here I have my bar, and I see people. Some clients have come from more than 25 years, they feel good here and me too, as long as I have my head and I'm able to stand". As you can imagine this is not the place for a crazy party or a romantic date, the stale air and the animal smell wouldn't help you (it's part of the authenticity, I suppose), but to hear some stories from an old parisian about owning a bar all her life.

Luca's Radars Sushiya
Sushiya For Sushi In Paris
5/1/2012 Restaurants, All-Paris Hood — Bored of all the chinese-fake sushi bars of Paris? If you are a raw fish lover this sushiya ("sushi...

Le P'tit Bar
Le P'tit Bar in Paris
4/13/2012 Nightlife, All-Paris Hood — This bar is a true time capsule. At first sight the front door can give the impression of an abandon...

Submitted Listings

Paris
Le P'tit Bar Le P'tit Bar, a quirky hole-in-the-wall
Sushiya
Sushiya